Essential Engagement, Development and Accountability

​Thirty years ago the average supervisor spent 25-30% of his or her time helping to develop employees and holding them accountable. Today that number hovers around 5%. Increasingly managers are paid for “doing”, not supervising. Time is not provided, nor are the tools and skills essential to develop employees utilized or improved. In place are “quick and dirty” scorecards, and meaningless peer reviews that fail to motivate, challenge or educate.

When Less Is More- we are not going to turn back the clock. Our Supervisory Dialogue provides extraordinary insight into individual direct reports and leverages both time and skills. An organization willing to provide 5 – 7% of time dedicated to effective supervision can create a true culture of engagement where employees feel valued and where supervisors are committed to their growth and development. 

FACT – There is increasing evidence* that more engaged workers who relate positively toward their managers contribute significantly more to the bottom line with measurably less turnover. Cultivating the supervisory /employee relationship is an integral investment.

Effective performance management is an integrative and seamless process of the following:

  • Maintaining the team and organizational vision
  • Establishing clear and measurable goals for the individual, the team and the organization
  • Aligning the values of the team or organization with actual behaviors, with consequences for not living the committed values
  • Ensuring that the mission of the team and the organization reflects the current market reality
  • Providing key team members with ongoing feedback so that adjustments to their leadership behavior can be made and accountability is not a one and done occurrence
  • Where adaptive management exists, guiding short and long term strategic goals that are measured regularly against progress

“The Value of Bosses”
Edward P. Lazear, Kathryn L. Shaw, Christopher T. Stanton
Working Paper 18317, http://www.nber.org/papers/w18317
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA  02138August 2012